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January 16, 2010

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I wonder if that BBC miniseries is any good; has anybody seen it?

I haven't. Netflix doesn't even seem to have it, which is weird, because usually they have everything.

Barnaby Rudge the musical is great I saw it in Scarborough.

Oh, lucky you! That must have been so much fun! :-)

It was. Barnaby Rudge is a complicated story but most of the important elements of the story were there on the stage.

I saw it in Scarborough, I agree it was brilliant. I enjoyed it so much I went to see it in Whitby as well.

I have what appears to be a first edition of this splendid book. No publication date, but Victorian and published by Cahpman and Hall Ltd.
Red binding with facsimile of Dickens signature on the front of the red embossed cover.
Ahny ideas as to the value of such a volume please?

Sorry, publishers should read Chapman and Hall.

I'm sorry, George, but I have no expertise in such matters.

Not strictly about the book itself, but there is some tantalising information about the silent 1915 version of Barnaby Rudge as an extra on a new DVD of the 1934 version of The Old Curiosity Shop. The same man, Thomas Bentley, directed both and apparently the silent 'BR' was spectacular, with a huge cast recreating the burning of Newgate etc. But alas, no print has survived.

Bentley's film of 'OCS' is a cracker too, with (for my money) the best-ever onscreen portrayal of Quilp by Hay Petrie. The DVD was released earlier this month and was warmly reviewed by The Daily Telegraph and (if I'm permitted a small plug) by yours truly on the Eye For Film website.

A 135-page analysis of the name Fagin in Oliver Twist has appeared as chapter 31 of David L. Gold's Studies in Etymology and Etiology (With Emphasis on Germanic, Jewish, Romance, and Slavic Languages), published by the University of Alicante. The analysis also gives Dickens's authentic Yiddish name. Parts of the book are now available on line as a Google book.

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WELCOME

  • A blog for all things Dickens -- quotes, reflections, adaptations, references and tributes from other authors, and more.

Happy 200th, Mr. Dickens!

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