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February 24, 2019

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Well said Gina!

I very much agree. What a complicated man he was. I both love and hate him.

I have been waiting to read your thoughts on this. I have thought about this period of Dickens life so many times as I am reading his books. These are some of my thoughts, Mr. Dickens loved his sister in law deeply. When she died he seemed to loose grip on life. There was the complexity of his own children, his parents and his own mortality. There was while he was famous, Catherine was aging too. My goodness, 10 children such a short amount of time. He was a vain man. A genius, and a talented man. Even a very selfish man. My heart breaks to think Mr. Dickens even entertained such thoughts, but given the pressure of life he must have been under, I am not excusing it in anyway, but I wonder if he was after all having a mid life crises?

(Going through menopause, I am not that sure, my own husband might not have considered putting me in an insane asylum a few times.) Lovely thoughts and I enjoyed this very much.
Kim

So do we have evidence except hearsay as to the contents of the letter? And I would like to know what behaviour caused some to call him, *mad* acting like a *madman*" or what reason to call him a *scoundrel.* Today a child might say "My dad was acting like he was nuts!" Or, in place of *scoundrel*" someone might say today, I thought of him as crazy or nasty. I would just like examples of behaviour or other evidence that led to these conclusions. Thanks!

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WELCOME

  • A blog for all things Dickens -- quotes, reflections, adaptations, references and tributes from other authors, and more.

Happy 200th, Mr. Dickens!

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